The Original Augusta Routing

THe 1934 Augusta Routing

Alister Mackenzie originally mapped out the course as it sits today but for some reason flipped the nines during course construction. 

By: Matt Fernandez

Alister Mackenzie originally mapped out the course as it sits today but for some reason flipped the nines during course construction.  The first hole was the current 10th hole and vice versa.

This reverse routing served as the routing for the very first Masters in 1934, aptly named the Augusta National Invitation Tournament.

The Original Masters Routing


Reversed routing layout proposed by Mackenzie during course construction. This served as the layout for the very first Masters.

Flip It & Reverse It


The course was soon flipped back to the original routing by the end of 1934 (the same routing used today).

The main reason? Due to the current front nine being the higher ground of the two nines, reversing the course to original routing would decrease frost delays, among other reasons.

The Finishing Nine


There's no doubt flipping the nines back to the original routing was for the best. The second nine has been home to major moments and momentum for nearly a century. The second nine is without a doubt the most entertaining finishing nine in golf.

Photo Archives

Photo above: Bobby Jones tees off in 1932 during the construction of Augusta National (Photo by Augusta National/Getty Images).

Photo Above: Bobby Jones and an engineer reviewing course drawings during construction (Photo by Augusta National/Getty Images).

Photo Above: Bobby Jones and Paul Runyan walk with their Caddies in 1934 (Photo by Bettmann Archive/Getty Images).

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